Day 1.5

The first day is always a bit of a haze, so we can count the first day as 0.5:) The teams are arriving, from all areas of my life, and the US. Santa Barbara, Memphis, Chicago, Abingdon…as always, it is a grand reunion, and such a joy! We have thus far converted an idle shell of a hospital to a facility with 5 operating room beds, a recovery room complete with critical care monitoring, a preoperative holding area, a pharmacy and inpatient medical/surgical ward. With an early core of volunteers, we are now ready to receive the big mission family!!!!

As  always, our hosts are gracious, the local team of volunteers excited and hard working, ready to serve their own. Seeing the Philippines through the eyes of friends who have never been, and through friends who call this part of the world home can be illuminating. It is hard not to learn a lesson from even one day of carefully sorting through precious medications so as not to lose one bottle, or one syringe to waste. We do much with little, serve many with a few. Our “few” is the largest ever, with 41 volunteers on this mission! We look forward to serving many, however, and many hands make light work.

I am so excited for our team, to experience this work in a personal and professional way. I am excited for myself and my family, to continue to grow with and through each other in this work. We are so blessed. And we are so grateful to be here.

Please pray for us, send good vibes, think good thoughts, and maybe check in every once in a while.

Advertisements

Day 3 Iligan Mission

img_2182Day 3 and 31 cases in!

We have had plenty of large difficult procedures, all life changing for both the patients, as well as the team. The stories from the families include: a young girl with an encephalocele (this is a birth defect where a person is born with a hole in her skull that allows part of the brain to protrude). She was unable to be cared for by her biological mother, abandoned and was then rescued and raised by her cousin.

Not all of our patients have such dramatic and tragic stories. Most of our folks have quite simply had to make life choices that impeded their ability to attain surgical care. This means we have patients who have been suffering from various problems for 12-25 years! YEARS! No tragedy, just simple life decisions made on life choices. This is the primary need we are filling. We are caring for people who have had to defer their health care due to life chances and choices. We aim to help them get back on their feet and to they walk of life. So far so good. We pray that we continue to do the work we are called to do, with the quality we aim to provide, and with the compassion and love we are commanded to share.

Global Surgery, University of Tennessee and an upcoming mission!

We have so much to report on, friends! But, I will keep it brief.

First, we are embarking on our next mission to serve the community of Iligan, Mindanao, Philippines in the coming month! We are so excited to serve this community, who has been waiting for us, as they initially experienced travesty and tragedy in 2011. Frequently, communities require immediate response with emergency type relief after such a disaster.

Check out the news post here: http://www.nbcnews.com/id/45721519/ns/weather/t/nearly-dead-after-philippines-typhoon-disaster-agency-reports/

We help in this disaster relief as much as possible. But as you are aware, our gifts are more of the ongoing variety, with our offered help in the area of surgery and medical care, long-delayed due to economic, social and resource barriers.

The community of Iligan has been preparing for us and others for the past 4 years, rebuilding and creating infrastructure to be able to receive and benefit from our investment of time, resources and care. We are so excited to respond to their stated need, and hope to assist in their long-term vision of care for their community.

Speaking of long term work, for the past year and a half, we (the Zalamea Fam) have been visioning, discussing, collecting ideas and in general, praying and listening, to ways in which we might be able to progress our work, or even focus it, on a single community for the purpose of long-term investment. This could look like many things, but in our minds and hearts, would be a way for us to bring the best of what we have to the table, be it relationships, physical resources, infrastructure, or direct care. The dream would be to bring all of the aforementioned to a single center, developed and built by the mission group, and designed for and with a single community.

Would it be a hospital? Or would it be a surgery center? Would it be a clinic? I think the answer to this is dependent on the needs of the community chosen. It would depend on the immediate needs, as well as the long-term challenges. We know from our public health friends that the ultimate determinants of health are not just biology, genetics and life choices. We know that life CHANCES, shaped by the social circumstances of education, work, social place and setting, as well as physical environment, all play an important role in the ultimate health of a community down to the individual level.

So, if we were to build say, a surgery center, and conduct multiple surgical and medical missions each year, could this recurring theme ultimately influence the long term health of a community? We think it could, and this would be a place to start. But, we wouldn’t want to begin there. We would want to build a facility that would immediately be capable of doing more, and for more people, but begin in a most humble way. Through friendships and agreements, we would want to grow to deliver more comprehensive care as deemed necessary by the community.

We would want to engage in educational partnerships for the benefit of training and inspiring learning surgeons and physicians to ultimately take over and replace us. In fact, this partnership is already beginning. With my work at the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, we are launching a Global Surgery Initiative, with the goals of providing infrastructure, mission/vision, and growth opportunities for all within UTHSC to engage in and learn from international work for the underserved. We would match this US-based educational partnership with a Philippines-based partnership as well.

The mission hospital would be a convener of ideas, care, and innovation for the poor. But more importantly, it would be a place where we can serve, stay true to our mission, and bring the best of what the Lord has given us! We would hope that by building such a facility in a place of particular need, we would invite others to join us: industry, technology, education, early childhood development and care, faith communities, etc.

Where do we begin? We begin where we currently stand. We start with the relationships and the communities we have been serving for the past 17 years. We begin by continuing the conversations with our friends from medical device industries, medical and surgical education, civic organizations, faith based friends, volunteers, and most importantly, the communities we have been serving.

Excitedly, and with much anticipation, therefore, we will be doing site visits to 3-4 communities in the Philippines after this next mission. We will present a map of possibilities, which will include every relationship and possibility we have explored and from whom we have received positive feedback and support. We will then listen. We will listen for a common vision and mission. We will listen for mutual respect. We will listen for a community that is committed to solidarity with the poor, with compassion and empathy. We will listen for a place to call the mission home.

Day 1/2: Set-up

So I completely neglected to write about yesterday’s screening clinic!

It felt like Day 2, but it was still Day 1, or Saturday:)

John and I had our pre-surgery GSurg clinic where we saw all of the folks who had been screened for General Surgery, both medically, and socioeconomically. Our partnerships with the wonderful local public health practitioners is clutch. They help us make sure we are serving the need.

A little background here. Negros Occidental, or the Western half of the island that we are on has endemic thyroid disease, primarily due to iodine deficiency. On my last research, as of 1983, over 70% of the 12 year olds in school were severely iodine deficient! This improved in 1998, which were the last stats I found. But the challenge around thyroid goiters remains.

So not surprisingly, many of our patients needed help with their thyroid goiters. These procedures can be super challenging, due to the vascularity (think lots of blood supply, so higher risk of bleeding) and the sheer size of them. Our record last year was a 15 cm thyroid lobe!

The other patients had primarily challenges with hernias. Many of them have been waiting YEARS for help with their challenges. We even had one patient that had seen us on our last mission in 2010. We did a hemithyroidectomy (removed half of her thyroid gland), but the other side enlarged and was starting to give her trouble. Because these tend to be challenging operations, and because she had not yet tried medication, we recommended that over surgery. If she had the operation, she had the risk of being on lifelong medication. And…if it is a decision she has to make, she would choose food and water over medicine, like all of us would.

I had a special moment in my heart honestly, running this clinic with my friend and colleague John ( I know, go ahead, roll your eyes), but it is a super special thing to be able to serve together. Not every day does this happen!!!!:) And to see Amber Rose and Tina working together tho figure out how to make our operating rooms work….and then to see our instruments from our last mission, organized and labeled by a surgeon that came with us last year, Jig Deneve, another fave of mine!

The local staff had to interpret for us as they spoke a completely different dialect from Tagalog, but good news was that with the little courtesy phrases I knew, they were understood as my attempt to show respect. Hoorah!

Remarkably we finished set-up on Saturday afternoon. We opened our blessed MAP International boxes, cleaned our beautiful Scanlan instruments, organized our Santa Barbara surgical supplies, sorted drains and prep from Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, and distributed our Ethicon sutures between rooms. And of course all of this was shipped with the funds from our GoFundMe campaign supporters. What a family of support we are!

So much to be grateful for. So blessed to have such a tight mission family. You all are with us. 🙂