Day 1/2: Set-up

So I completely neglected to write about yesterday’s screening clinic!

It felt like Day 2, but it was still Day 1, or Saturday:)

John and I had our pre-surgery GSurg clinic where we saw all of the folks who had been screened for General Surgery, both medically, and socioeconomically. Our partnerships with the wonderful local public health practitioners is clutch. They help us make sure we are serving the need.

A little background here. Negros Occidental, or the Western half of the island that we are on has endemic thyroid disease, primarily due to iodine deficiency. On my last research, as of 1983, over 70% of the 12 year olds in school were severely iodine deficient! This improved in 1998, which were the last stats I found. But the challenge around thyroid goiters remains.

So not surprisingly, many of our patients needed help with their thyroid goiters. These procedures can be super challenging, due to the vascularity (think lots of blood supply, so higher risk of bleeding) and the sheer size of them. Our record last year was a 15 cm thyroid lobe!

The other patients had primarily challenges with hernias. Many of them have been waiting YEARS for help with their challenges. We even had one patient that had seen us on our last mission in 2010. We did a hemithyroidectomy (removed half of her thyroid gland), but the other side enlarged and was starting to give her trouble. Because these tend to be challenging operations, and because she had not yet tried medication, we recommended that over surgery. If she had the operation, she had the risk of being on lifelong medication. And…if it is a decision she has to make, she would choose food and water over medicine, like all of us would.

I had a special moment in my heart honestly, running this clinic with my friend and colleague John ( I know, go ahead, roll your eyes), but it is a super special thing to be able to serve together. Not every day does this happen!!!!:) And to see Amber Rose and Tina working together tho figure out how to make our operating rooms work….and then to see our instruments from our last mission, organized and labeled by a surgeon that came with us last year, Jig Deneve, another fave of mine!

The local staff had to interpret for us as they spoke a completely different dialect from Tagalog, but good news was that with the little courtesy phrases I knew, they were understood as my attempt to show respect. Hoorah!

Remarkably we finished set-up on Saturday afternoon. We opened our blessed MAP International boxes, cleaned our beautiful Scanlan instruments, organized our Santa Barbara surgical supplies, sorted drains and prep from Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, and distributed our Ethicon sutures between rooms. And of course all of this was shipped with the funds from our GoFundMe campaign supporters. What a family of support we are!

So much to be grateful for. So blessed to have such a tight mission family. You all are with us. 🙂

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